A CLOUD OF QUILT PATTERNS: AN ENCYCLOPEDIA OF PATTERN IN BLOG FORM UPDATES & ADDITIONS BY BARBARA BRACKMAN

Monday, June 20, 2016

Tessellations: Hexagons 4---Medallions Stars

Late -19th-century charm quilt

Geometry gives us many ways to set hexagons together.
Some of the most amazing are medallions that radiate out from a 6-pointed star.

It's a challenge to keep these designs going

Collection: Missouri Historical Society

Indianapolis Museum of Art

It's supposed to have 19,567 hexagons.

They are all variations of BlockBase #160.

Here are two small shots I found on the internet,
both look to be mid to late 20th century.


As with all hexagon quilts one has to resolve the edges.
Six sided textiles make better table cloths than bed coverings.

Art Institute of Chicago

"Fragment" from the collection of the Quilters' Guild, UK

Shown in Chicago.




Patricia Smith Collection


The king of star medallions is Albert Small of Ottawa, Illinois
whose three mosaic quilts are in the collection of the Illinois
State Museum. 
Click on these Quilt Index links to see all three


http://www.quiltindex.org/fulldisplay.php?kid=16-33-2

http://www.quiltindex.org/fulldisplay.php?kid=16-33-13B

http://www.quiltindex.org/fulldisplay.php?kid=16-33-13C



And here's a link to his chief competitor Grace Snyder's star hexagon medallion at the International Quilt Study Center and Museum:
http://newsroom.unl.edu/releases/2013/11/26/Program+teaches+history+via+beloved+quilter,+'Pioneer+Girl'+Grace+Snyder

7 comments:

  1. I remained stunned that anyone has the stamina to make these huge, complex quilts.

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  2. I remained stunned that anyone has the stamina to make these huge, complex quilts.

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  3. This is wonderful! Love browsing and then knowing where to come back for more info!!!!

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  4. I'm really enjoying your tesselation series. I've made countless hexagon quilts and have many on the go. One of my favourites is my version of a quilt made in 1830 by Elizabeth Van Horne Clarkson and it is now owned by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I made my version from a small black and white picture but had no information about who made the quilt, where it resided or its history. Thirteen years after I finished mine I came across the original. I would be happy to send you a link to my quilt if you are interested in seeing it!

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    1. Oh do send a link.I intend to do a post on quilts copied from that photo. I may have yours already!

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    2. I wrote several posts about this quilt but here is one that shows the original quilt, a later version of the same quilt and my version of the quilt. http://faeriesandfibres.blogspot.ca/2014/02/a-question-about-basting-and-another.html

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  5. I think this blog is going to be more temptation than is good for me, Barbara! But, thanks so much for doing it -- it's really generous, and I think it will inspire a lot of people. (And probably me...)

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