A CLOUD OF QUILT PATTERNS: AN ENCYCLOPEDIA OF PATTERN IN BLOG FORM UPDATES & ADDITIONS BY BARBARA BRACKMAN

Monday, July 4, 2016

Tessellations: Hexagons 6---Diamond Field

Most of us would call this tessellating design a 
Diamond Field.

Eveline Foland's 1932 name in the Kansas City Star
has become the standard.

It's #160m, below. from my Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns.

The Diamond Field - KC Star 1932
Rainbow Tile - Carrie Hall 1935
Martha Washington's Flower Garden - Spool Cotton 1940

The VerMerhren pattern company called it Diamond Field too.
It's an elongated rosette.

Mountain Mist--- a rather generic name: Mosaic.

The pattern is older than the published 20th-century names.

L Cordelia and Hannah Mallow dated this one 1876

Dana Balsalmo has one that looks to be pre-Civil War

A glimpse of a similar Turkey red example with a chintz border.

From Laura Fisher's shop---perhaps 1870s
Difficult to know if they are British or American


This variation from Bonham's in London done in very British purples,

Ganged into fours.

Henretta Bond in Georgetown Kentucky

It's easy to spot the 20th century versions by the colors.

Ella Harnan from International Quilt Study Center and Museum

Above and Below from Cindy's Antique Quilts.

Variations, keep adding rows.

From the Briscoe Center



Then there are shape variations.

Mary Kerr's Hexagon Collection

A 19th-century example painted by the
Index of American Design in the 1940s

Mary Gasperik's "Victory Garden" from 1940
See it at the Quilt Index here:


This common variation doesn't qualify as 
 a tessellation because it has two pieces...

Hexagons and diamonds.

And that's it for #160m.

2 comments:

  1. Nice to see these. I much prefer the "diamond" hexagon formation to the rosette. Maybe I'Ve seen too many 30's Grandmother's Flower Garden quilts in those pastel colors.

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  2. It boggles my mind to think about how many hexagons have been sewn into quilts - a very versatile shape with ENDLESS design possibilities.

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